WHAT IS DURABLE HARDWOOD ?

Max Swire

In Materials, Timber Posted

Ok so lets get the basics out the way first,

DURABLE: 

adjective

long-lasting; enduring

 

HARDWOOD: 

noun

the hard, compact wood or timber of various trees, as the oak, cherry, maple, or mahogany.

External street furniture is a funny thing as not everyone seems to know what type of timber to specify on a scheme. It is tricky to choose the correct timber for the correct product as price vs longevity tends to creep into the argument.

Let’s start off with categorizing the hardwoods into 1-5 classes, class 1 being the hardest timber.

Remember when looking at timber, the tighter the grain, the harder the timber.

CLASS 1 – VERY DURABLE

With a lifetime span of 25+ Years Durability

  • Afzelia
  • Opepe
  • Pau Amarelo
  • Cumaru
  • Mora
  • Accoya (Modified Radiata Pine)
  • Jarrah
  • Curupay
  • Accoya Alder (Modified Alder)
  • Itauba
  • Wallaba
  • Denya
  • Lignum Vitae (A.K.A. Iron Wood)
  • Ebony
  • Rosewood
  • Makore
  • Greenheart
  • Massaranduba
  • Teak
  • Padauk (A.K.A Barwood, Camwood)
  • Red Angelim

 

CLASS 2 – DURABLE

With a lifetime span of 15-25 Years Durability

  • Sucupira
  • Iroko
  • Guarea
  • American Mahogany
  • Balau (A.K.A. Red Balau, Yellow Balau)
  • Massaranduba
  • Afrormosia
  • Garapa
  • Andira
  • European Oak (Inc English Oak, French Oak, Polish Oak, Slovenian Oak)
  • Thermowood Redwood (Modified European Redwood – Softwood)
  • Piqua
  • Western Red Cedar (A.K.A Red Cedar)
  • Central / South American Cedar (A.K.A Cedro Rosa)
  • Merbau
  • Ekki
  • Sepetir
  • Angelim
  • Kempas
  • Moabi
  • Sweet Chestnut
  • Kapur
  • Wenge
  • Tatajuba
  • Karri
  • Red Louro

 

CLASS 3 – MODERATELY DURABLE

With a lifetime span of 10-15 Years Durability

  • Garapa
  • Douglas Fir
  • European Cherry
  • Gedu Nohor
  • Sapele
  • European Walnut
  • Siberian Larch
  • American Cherry (A.K.A Black Cherry)
  • Caribbean Pitch Pine (A.K.A Pitch Pine)
  • Taun (A.K.A Malagai)
  • Gombe
  • Cambara
  • Tasmanian Oak (A.K.A Australian Oak, Alpine Ash)
  • Red Grandis (A.K.A Rose Gum, Flooded Gum)
  • Louro
  • Courbaril
  • Idigbo
  • Keruing
  • European Larch
  • Imbiua
  • Dahoma
  • Guariuba
  • Utile
  • Japanese Oak
  • American Walnut
  • Western Red Cedar
  • Danta
  • Niangon
  • Movingue
  • American White Oak
  • Mandio
  • African Mahogany
  • Purpleheart

 

CLASS 4 – SLIGHTLY DURABLE

With a lifetime span of 5-10 Years Durability

  • Limba
  • European Larch
  • White Elm
  • Siberian Larch
  • Rock Maple
  • Scots Pine
  • Patula Pine
  • Martime Pine
  • Tulipwood
  • European Whitewood
  • Mengkulang
  • Light Red Meranti
  • Yellow Pine
  • Douglas Fir
  • Andiroba
  • Soft Maple
  • Corsican Pine
  • Canadian Red Pine
  • Jelutong
  • Dark Red Meranti
  • Western Hemlock
  • Ponderosa Pine
  • Gaboon
  • European Elm
  • Jack Pine
  • Elliotis Pine
  • Japanese Larch
  • African Walnut
  • Lodgepole Pine
  • Yellow Meranti
  • Nyatoa
  • European redwood
  • American Red Oak
  • Southern Pine
  • Hickory

 

CLASS 5 – NON DURABLE

With a lifetime span of Less Than 5 Years Durability

  • Ramin
  • European Beech
  • Willow
  • Balsa
  • Red Alder
  • Rubberwood
  • Koto
  • Basswood (A.K.A Limewood)
  • Horse Chestnut
  • Light Virola
  • European Ash
  • Sycamore (A.K.A Great Maple)
  • Simarouba
  • Geronggang
  • Sitka Spruce
  • American Ash
  • Parana Pine
  • Alder
  • European Lime
  • Sesendok
  • Poplar
  • Obeche
  • Abura
  • European Plane
  • American Birch

Please note that some timbers are listed more than once in different classes, the durability of these timbers is affected depending on the origin of the timber.

OK SO WHAT DOES ALL THIS INFORMATION TELL US ?

The durability of timber is categorised into how long your product will last. The term “you get what you pay for” springs to mind.

When specifying a bench for example and you are after a 25+ year durability. You must choose the correct timber to suit this durability, keeping in mind that the harder the timber the longer the life expectancy.

WHAT DO LOGIC USE ON STREET FURNITURE ?

The quick answer is we use whatever our client wants to use, but we would advise them on to 25+ years timbers if the budget will take it as they receive a superior product that will last.

Why do we care what timber goes on a scheme? The quick answer is because we are proud of what we produce and in 25 years’ time the product will live on.

25+ Year

Hardwood: Seat & Benches, Planters, Pergolas, Cycle Shelters

  • Opepe, Teak, Cumaru

15-25 Year

Hardwood: Seat & Benches, Planters, Pergolas, Cycle Shelters

  • Iroko, Ekki, European Oak

10-15 Year

Softwood: Seat & Benches, Planters, (Cost Effective Option)

  • Douglas Fir – Treated
  • European Larch

What we find with timber is that budget does define the end product. Although we would always suggest the hardest timbers are best, we do understand that street furniture is the last items on a scheme so the budget on furniture may have been taken up elsewhere.

Logic are 100% FSC Certified

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